“Groundhog Day”

Susan Granger’s review of “Groundhog Day” (August Wilson Theater)

When Andy Karl tore a knee ligament three days before this new musical opened, people worried whether he’d be able to perform the strenuous routines. I’m happy to report that, miraculously, he runs, jumps and leaps – magnificently – aided by a black leg brace that he doesn’t even bother to disguise.

Based on Billy Murray’s beloved 1993 film, it’s the saga of worn-out Pittsburgh weatherman Phil Connors, who is trapped in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, for a single day, February 2nd – that repeats and repeats and repeats.

As Groundhog Day dawns, supercilious Phil shows nothing but contempt for the celebrated rodent and “small town hicks” he’s forced to contend with, sarcastically sneering, “Will he see his shadow? Won’t he? Civilization once again hangs in the balance.”

“Small towns, tiny minds/Big mouths, small ideas…”is the way he refers to the quaint, rural community, despite the entreaties of his producer, Rita Hanson (Barrett Doss). Eventually, of course, bewildered Phil is humbled by the surreal situation in which he’s trapped and comes to recognize the kindness and humanity of the townsfolk who surround him.

Adapted by Danny Rubin from his own time-loop screenplay with songs by composer/lyricist Tim Minchin, it’s adroitly directed by Matthew Warchus, utilizing Rob Howell’s ingenious set designs, utilizing five interlocking turntables, and Paul Kieve’s amusing optical illusions.

What’s missing is the strong character arc that Bill Murray established with director Harold Ramis. While his Phil Connors was a nasty misanthrope, Andy Karl’s is just snarky and cynical. Nevertheless, you cheer when Rita helps him drop his negativity and open his heart to the simple pleasures of the world around him.

A Broadway veteran whose resume includes “Rocky,” “On the Twentieth Century” and “Legally Blonde,” Andy Karl is terrific, deserving of the standing ovation he gets after every performance. And Rebecca Faulkenberry brings down the house with her “Playing Nancy” lament.

Warning note to theatergoers: the August Wilson Theater is riddled with stairs, up-and-down, more than any other Broadway Theater. To get to your seats, it’s a hike!